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Interesting, interesting, interesting. If you’re on the Fortune 100 you’re not just good, you’re great, right? If you weren’t aware, the Fortune rankings look at public and private companies and compare their revenues in their respective fiscal years. The list includes the who’s who of companies like Walmart, Apple, and Ford to name a few.

You get the idea, but why am I bringing up the Fortune 100? Well, we’ve been doing a lot of research on cadence. If you didn’t catch it, you should check out our Cadence Audit research report where we examined at nearly 9,000 companies sales cadences and the five elements that great cadences have.

Here are the five elements of a cadence as outlined in the research paper.

  • Attempts – The total number of touches
  • Media – The media pattern used
  • Duration – The length of time from first touch to last touch
  • Spacing – The time gap between attempts
  • Content – The messaging utilized

When we started auditing companies we thought we should audit the Fortune 100 and determine who was the best of the best. You might be wondering how we scored each of the cadences. If I told you I’d probably have to kill you but know we came up with a really sophisticated way to score each element and provide an overall score on a scale of 1-5, where 1 means your sales cadence sucks and 5 means your sales cadences rocks. Get it? Got it? Good.

Here are the top five sales cadences from the Fortune 100.

1 – Citibank – 4.73 out of 5

It’s not my bank but apparently it’s a pretty good bank, at least when it comes to how they reach out to potential customers. The attempts are solid and by the far the best of any of the Fortune 100 companies. Citibank takes a hit by only using two types of of communication methods but recovers with a longer duration and decent spacing.

2 – MetLife – 4.20 out of 5

MetLife holds its own on its cadence and received a solid score. It misses on all pillars but one but it doesn’t miss by too much. Its attempts and duration are a little below the mark but spacing is pretty close to the target.

3 – AT&T – 4.15 out of 5

It’s a decent drop from the number one spot but AT&T holds strong at the number three. It’s spacing and media kept it in the running by using three communication types and keeping the spacing in the optimal range. The attempts were a little low and the duration fell short of the mark.

4 – Dow Jones – 3.35 out of 5

Dow Jones had a great duration but because the attempts were low it makes the cadence weaker. That combined with an average of 9.2 day spacing doesn’t help. It’s great that they used all three media types of phone, voicemail, and email.

5 – Sysco – 3.34 out of 5

Rounding out the top five is Sysco. The attempts is low but it’s better than number four on this list. The media and spacing is pretty strong but the duration is too short.

Pretty interesting right? Well, I have something even cooler. How would you like to assess your sales cadence? What if you could compare your sales cadence against best practices cadences of thousands of companies? I think it’s pretty cool and I think you’ll like it. Click this button and get your score.